Do you want to fight climate change? Stop believing these myths


MJ: Peak oil was a big deal 15 years ago, even 10 years ago. The latest news in the packing of oil and olive rocks has certainly changed things, and therefore not much has been heard about peak oil.

I advise politicians, but sometimes I'm in the same room with other people, energy advocates, and environmentalists. They're going to be there saying, oh, you know, we have to postpone because we're going to run out of oil, and the price is going to be really high. And, of course, I hear the words of a politician, well, wait a minute, if the price really goes down, then I don't need to do anything. The idea is that either renewable energy is going to get so cheap, or oil and coal are going to get so expensive – that we will stop using fossil fuels and that can solve the problem. Sometimes these are the same people who are concerned about climate change and concerned about energy waste. So I'm trying to bring them to the same page.

In Canada, you have made significant progress in decarbonization in recent years. In the meantime, we have the Trump administration. How do we fight climate change if our government takes us deeper into the hell of a climate?

MJ: You'd be surprised how people might look at the same thing as Australian burning or Donald Trump looking at the snow and get completely different interpretations of what this evidence had to say about the natural world around us. In other words, a person can refuse rejection for a very long time. And is this a message of complete despair? No, but this is an attempt at realism.

So when people say we need to put more effort into Alberta and Australia's coal regions and the upbringing of the Appalachian and Texas peoples, I'm OK, Or you go around them. If you look at other environmental solutions in the past, such as acid rain, sulfur emissions from US coal plants, etc. – I'm not saying it's all exactly the same, but when you try to learn other things you don't convince me everyone And then you move forward. You have convinced enough people who have adopted climate sincerity, either sincere sincerity, or sincere government. An example of this is Ontario, which reduces coal plants; It happened for 10 years. Even if that government fell eight years later, then the coal plants were already doomed. So, I believe in a policy of quick steps to prevent them from changing.

Let's talk about carbon taxes, the idea of ​​separating emissions from pollution, in the absence of pollutants. Some say that this will only help us reduce emissions.

MJ: Flexible regulations are almost as economically viable. So they might be better off politically, for example way Better – and only slightly less efficient economically. So I warn people who feel they have to pay their carbon taxes, or they are not going to work, or they will not be economically viable, or you will not be able to procure industry, etc.

You may be the country doing what Canada has done. It is said that we are going to remove the coal plants and do so by regulation.

[Countries] I can still say, China, we carry goods from us. And we have noticed that the carbon content of your electricity is such and such. So we are going to set a tariff on these goods.

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